Thursday, December 11, 2014

Reindeer Populations On The Decline Due To Climate Change, Study Says

An old trick:  Choosing start and end points without looking at the in-between. Chinese reindeer populations may indeed have dropped over 25 percent since "the 1970s".  But if, as alleged, that was due to global warming, the population drop must now have ceased and the population must now be stable.  Why?  Because the warming stopped rising 18 years ago.  The temperature is stable to within hundredths of a degree.

We also read that the reindeer population in the Taymyr peninsula of Russia, "has declined from about 1 million reindeer in 2000 to 700,000 in 2013".   Sad, no doubt, but warming was not the culprit -- because there wasn't any warming over that period

Reindeer populations across the world are plummeting, thanks to a combination of factors including climate change and human interference, a new study has found. This decrease could actually have lasting effects on climate change, even outside of the Arctic.

The study, which focused on reindeer native to China, found that the populations have seen large declines. In China, reindeer populations have dropped over 25 percent since the 1970s. Mount Daxinganling is the main habitat for reindeer in China. It has been negatively impacted by climate change, causing to soil degradation and higher temperatures, which have hurt reindeer. Human interference, such as poaching for antlers which are used in traditional Chinese medicine, the selling of reindeer to tourists, and reindeer being killed by cars, also have hurt the populations in China.

While the study focuses solely on reindeer populations in China, the trend is not limited to that country. A 2013 report by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration found that major reindeer herds in Alaska, Canada, and Russia have all seen declines in population. The largest herd, located in the Taymyr peninsula of Russia, has declined from about 1 million reindeer in 2000 to 700,000 in 2013. The report also found that many reindeer herd’s ranges are smaller than they have been in the past. In 2012, the International Fund of Wildlife’s Jeff Flocken said there has been roughly a 60 percent decline from historical high levels, and that the decline was caused by climate change.

Loss of reindeer populations could actually exacerbate climate change. Researchers in Finland have found that grazing by reindeer can help prevent solar heat absorption which can lead to climate change. In their study, they found that areas where reindeer did not graze had higher levels of heat radiation, thanks to higher levels of shrubs and trees that absorbed heat. A Swedish study has found that reindeer can also prevent the climate-change-caused spread of invasive species in the Arctic tundra.


Posted by John J. Ray (M.A.; Ph.D.).

1 comment:

Wireless.Phil said...

Went to school with a kid, he now owns a real reindeer farm in Ohio.

As for the ones in China, maybe the starving Chinese pesants ate them?

Also, they cound be hiding?

One of Norway's hottest summers on record has caused overheated reindeer to take refuge in a highway tunnel located in the far north of the country.
The invasion came as temperatures soared to 72 degrees Fahrenheit at the 1.4-mile-long Stallogargo tunnel, located about 250 miles north of the Arctic Circle and near the Nordic outpost of Hammerfest.

Temperatures there peaked at 84 degrees earlier this summer.

“Our maintenance crew attempted to chase the reindeer out of the tunnel, but it’s hopeless; after a few hours they’re back,” highway official Tor Inge Hellander told the Finnmark Dagblad daily.

Drivers were forced for two days to take a detour on a precarious, narrow road due to the danger of striking the Arctic grazers.

Hellander says that the reindeer typically stop entering the tunnel as soon as it cools off outside.


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